Around the Table – July 31, 2019

Summer Enrichments

I recently heard that the four seasons in the south can be defined as Allergy, Summer, Hurricane and Football. I think we all can agree we are very much into summer. While the definitions of these seem self-explanatory, I want to describe to you what the summer season means to me.
 
Summer itself arrives stealthily, but then instantly the heat is upon us. The heat provides me with the time and opportunity to take a step back, establish, reflect and look toward the future. I want to share with you a few things we are working on in the Culinary Department during the summer.
 
PERSONAL FOCUS
It’s no secret the goal of a culinary team is to provide high-quality food and excellent service to our members. This goal can only be achieved with the cooperation, support, and creativity of the entire team.
 
We continue to acclimate Chef Anthony to our team and methods, and the service team remains focusing on training and knowledge while we continue to improve creativity by involving the team on all levels. Take a football team for example, each player on the team has a different role and each player offers a unique skill- but all have the same goal of winning the game. The same applies for a our industry. Individual creativity of our team contributes to the team’s success, which in return, makes the dining experience more enjoyable for you.
 
PRODUCT FOCUS
The Ingredients of Summer
There are tons of fresh produce available this time of year. Peachessweet corn and blueberries are summertime staples, but venture out this summer and try produce like figs, okra or tomatillos.
 
New Flavors
We’re begging you to be adventurous! It’s easy to stick to a basic meal of a hamburger and french fries. However, branching out and trying different foods is not only delicious, but it is also good for you! Trying new flavors could be more nutritious, or dare we say it, you could even discover a new favorite!
 
New Options
We know you love the Steve Salad, but try new things! We’re pleased to be offering more seafood. Besides, seafood is not only great for your health, it’s versatile and….delicious!
 
PROCESS FOCUS
  • Food Consistencies – this is an on-going effort in every kitchen. We know the importance of consistencies, rather it be the appearance, flavor, or all of the above
  • Keeping the Menus Up-to-Date – if it’s not selling – it’s gone!
  • Making it Lighter – a lighter approach to the day-to-day cooking principals. The heat of summer often steals the body’s hunger and leaves you wanting more foods like salads and seafood. So, when the summer heat is against you, we’re here for you!
  • Lightening the Buffets – especially after 18 holes in a southern heat wave! Am I right?!

As I mentioned above, I like to take the summer not only to prepare and look ahead, but to reflect. What better way to reflect than to provide you with a 4th of July food recap. Prepare to be amazed…or shocked. You be the judge!
 
Conservatively, in rounded numbers, this is just some of what you enjoyed:
 
  • 200 pounds of shrimp
  • 360 hamburgers
  • 320 hot dogs
  • 160 bratwursts
  • 150 pounds of pork shoulder
  • 200 pounds of beef brisket
  • 150 pounds of pork ribs
  • A panel truck full of fresh produce
  • 500 cupcakes
  • 360 cookies
On that note, enjoy your summer, eat light and stay cool!
-Chef Robert

Two Qualifiers for the U.S. Senior Amateur Championship

Colleton River Club is pleased to announce that two of our Members have qualified to play in the U.S. Senior Amateur Championship at Old Chatham Golf Club in Durham, NC from August 24-29, 2019.

Duke Delcher secured his opportunity to compete at the end of August with a 1-under 71 score(70) in the 18-hole qualifier at The Kittansett Club of Massachusetts on Monday, July 29th.   Delcher finished first on the leader board and earned medalist honors on the 18-hole course which is tucked along a peninsula on Buzzards Bay and served as the first step for hopeful competitors to advance to the 2019 Championship Proper. https://www.massgolf.org/news/19ussramrecap/

Also, on Monday, July 29th, Kevin King earned one of the six qualifying spots at the 2019 USGA U.S. Senior Amateur Sectional Qualifying at Biltmore Forest Country Club in Asheville, North Carolina.   King tied for second at the event with a score of 71.

https://www.carolinasgolf.org/blog-post/home/homepage/year/2019/id/290975/us-senior-amateur-qualifying-results-biltmore-forest

Kent’s Korner – Vegetarians

On hot summer days, Lowcountry menus offer refreshing summer salads with a variety of locally grown fruits and vegetables. Taking note of the abundant summer harvest, the Agronomy Department is employing an additional group of hungry triploid grass carp to help with the smorgasbord of weeds growing in the course ponds. These newest additions to Colleton River Club are true vegetarians that enjoy feeding on hydrilla, pondweed, spike rush, naiads, alligator weed and grass clippings.  Grass carp can grow to as much as fifty pounds and can eat as much as their own body weight in a single day. These sterile relatives to the Asian carp will not reproduce but can live for up to ten years and provide a cost-effective means for reducing aquatic weeds.  We believe the addition of grass carp as a biological control method, along with aeration and normal treatments will help improve the quality of the ponds at Colleton River Club. 

Mature grass carp can grow to as much as fifty pounds

Group Charter Trip – July 5th

Members and their guests enjoyed a Group Fishing Charter on Friday, July 5th with Captain Jason!  Check out some of their catches…

Howard York’s son with shark

Howard York’s grandson

Richard Collela fishing

Dennis Zvosec with shark

 

 

Kent’s Korner – Speed Management

As part of our normal maintenance at Colleton River Club, we measure green speeds daily with a Stimpmeter and post them in the golf shop. Used on a level portion of the green, this tool is designed to release a golf ball from an inclined plane at a consistent height. Taking the average distance in feet of three balls rolled in opposing directions determines the Stimpmeter reading, or green speed. At higher green speeds, more caution is required when putting. In 1978 the USGA adopted the use of the Stimpmeter to provide consistency throughout their championships.
  
Along with knowing how fast the greens are putting, Stimpmeter readings and surface firmness measurements are tools we use in the agronomy department to help direct maintenance activities. Everything that occurs on a golf course happens in a cyclical pattern. Along with weather, normal sound maintenance practices such as topdressing, grooming, venting, fertilizing, and irrigating all affect green speed and play an important role in producing healthy turf. This week we vented and topdressed the Nicklaus Course greens to address the surface firmness. Immediately following these procedures, the green speeds temporarily take a back seat to the agronomy practices that are required to sustain the playing conditions we all desire. Knowing the speed limit, by prioritizing and managing these steps in a thoughtful, calculated approach is the key to sustaining good conditions. Next time you are in the golf shop and notice the green speed in the tens, consider what the agronomy team is doing to improve the turf health and achieve the consistently smooth and fast greens we have become accustomed to.   
 

Venting to incorporate sand

Kent’s Korner – Course Stewardship

Summer rains create soft conditions that promote ball marks when shots hit the greens. Please be stewards of the course by practicing good golf etiquette and repairing ball marks. A wise old pro once said, “A good player understands that it is their responsibility to return the course better than when they approached it.” After hitting a good shot into the green, please diligently inspect the green and repair ball marks or indentations in the surface. Freshly made ball marks are easier to repair than pitch marks that remain unattended overnight. When repairing a ball mark, it is best to avoid lifting or prying up on the indention. Insert a ball mark repair tool or tee at the edge of the indention and heal the mark by lightly pressing down and toward the center of the damaged area. Make several successive nudges toward the direction of the incoming shot, and then tap the area down with the heel of your putter. Next time you enjoy the course, encourage your foursome of friends to assist you with tending to ball marks on the greens. Click here for the video on how to properly repair a ball mark.

A ball mark creates a road block for the golf ball

 

TRX at the Fitness Center

TRX is a full body workout that uses the person’s own body weight as the resistance instead of machines or dumbbells. TRX Suspension Training develops strength, balance, cardiovascular endurance, flexibility and core stability simultaneously. We have eight TRX Suspension Trainer “straps” mounted from the ceiling in our fitness studio. Each student has their own TRX Suspension Trainer to use during the class. There is another mounted at the front of the class for me, your instructor to demonstrate the exercises for you. 

If I had to choose only one training tool to use, I would easily pick the TRX Suspension Trainer because it is a highly portable performance training tool that leverages gravity and the user’s body weight to complete 100s of exercises. You’re in control of how much you want to challenge yourself during each exercise – because you can simply adjust your body position to add or decrease resistance. I really love how the TRX uses so many muscle groups at one time. The beauty of the TRX is that even when an exercise focuses on your upper body, it still recruits your core, glutes and legs to keep your body stable. Plus, the instability of the straps and handles increases the benefits to the muscles you’re targeting.

Advantages of our TRX Suspension Trainer Class:

  • Delivers a fast, effective total-body workout. We hit ALL the muscle groups 
  • Helps build a rock-solid core. You are using your CORE the entire class
  • Increases muscular strength, endurance and flexibility. Good for golf, tennis, good for LIFE!
  • Benefits people of all fitness levels (pro athletes to seniors, class regulars to beginners)
  • By utilizing your own body weight, the TRX Suspension Trainer provides greater performance and functionality than large exercise machines.

We have two TRX classes at the Club. Tuesday mornings at 8:00 and 9:00. The class is easily modified so it’s great for beginners. It may look intimidating to walk into a TRX class for the first time and see the yellow and black straps hanging from the ceiling, but it’s not at all scary! TRX is a lot of fun and I will be there to guide you every step of the way. We start each class with a simple warmup that helps you get the feel for the TRX Suspension Trainer (the straps). The first half hour we do standing exercises that work the entire body, then we get down on the floor for planks and bridges using the TRX. We spend the last 10 minutes stretching. TRX is a great class and we hope you will join us!

Jessica Haynes

Personal Trainer

Kent’s Korner – July 5, 2019

When Johnny Miller retired from the NBC telecast in February, greenskeepers around the globe had hoped the term “grain” would fade into obscurity. While the term is generally overused to describe missed putts, it can be an accurate way to describe the lateral growth habit produced by ultra-dwarf bermudagrasses. If left unattended, these stems grow in abundance down slopes creating an obvious surface pattern. While playing either of the courses at Colleton River, from time to time, you may notice small parallel lines running across the green’s surfaces. The fine lines evident on the putting surfaces are a result of recent verticutting/grooming procedures. Rather than cutting on a horizontal plane like a normal mower, these cutting units rotate vertically into the turf surface. Set slightly below the height of cut, these blades penetrate the turf, severing stolons (plant shoots along the surface) and thinning the leaf canopy. Following the grooming, we topdress the greens to fill any voids and further smooth the playing surface. These cultivation techniques optimize putting quality, reduce grain, promote an upright growth habit, alleviate spongy surface conditions, and enhance surface smoothness. Immediately following this process, the greens may slow down slightly and appear scarred from the disruption. These procedures are normally completed during course closures, and in approximately seven to ten days following the process the greens will be smoother, faster, and firmer. We hope everyone enjoys Colleton River Club over the holiday weekend, and I hope to see you on the course.

Grooming short term disruption for long term gains