Around the Table – October 10, 2019

FALL AFFINITIES

When the temperatures drop and the sun starts to fade, I’m in full-on braise mode. To me (and I hope I’m not alone), braising is the ideal method of fall cooking. It’s an easy technique that guarantees flavorful, warming results. Braising is a well-kept kitchen secret that makes heroes out of weekend (or weekday) cooks. There’s no other technique that asks so little yet gives so much back. Sure, braising requires some practice, but the good news is that you’ve probably already done it. If you have ever cooked a pot roast or even operated a crockpot, you have braised. But the beauty of braising comes from what you like to braise, how you develop flavors, and most importantly – the ingredient selections.

FALL BRAISING TECHNIQUES & RED WINE

I think we can all agree that wine is a delicious flavor, rather it’s poured in your preferred glass or used to enhance the taste of your favorite dish. Red wine is an important ingredient of most braised dishes and is a natural enhancement that encourages richness and succulence to the dishes. In my opinion, there’s no such thing as cooking wine and would suggest using table wine in the dishes you prepare. Don’t cook with something you wouldn’t drink!

THE RECIPE – BRAISED BEFF & FALL VEGETABLES

 
Ingredients
  • 1 – 1 ½ pounds of Beef Short Rib, Top Blade or Chuck Flap
  • Oil for searing
  • 1 cup each organic celery, carrot and onion
  • 1 cup dry red wine (we talked about this)
  • 1 generous sprig of fresh thyme
  • Coarse salt and fresh ground black pepper
  • 3 cups veal stock
  • 1 cup veal demi-glace or refined stock
Method
  • Trim away excess fat, if any, season freely with salt & pepper
  • Sear in a hot pan until crisp and develop color, be careful not to burn.
  • Remove to an oven proof pan
  • Add the vegetables and caramelize evenly and deeply, remove/reserve
  • Add the red wine and reduce by half
  • Add the stock and reduce by one third
  • In the oven proof pan, combine the meat, vegetables, reduced liquids and thyme sprig
  • Cover with lid or foil and braise for 1 to 1 ½ hours, at 300F
  • Remove, uncover and test for tenderness. If more time is needed, keep cooking
  • When very tender, remove the meat from the pan, strain the braising jus and return to reduce
  • Taste, reduce slowly, season, skim away any fats, and taste away
 
Enjoy with red wine and good friends!

PROVISIONALLY SPEAKING

We are happy to furnish you with fresh-refined stocks and finished veal demi, if you desire. As part of the our process we keep these items on hand and they may be ordered through the Nicklaus Clubhouse! 

BE ADVENTUROUS

The gloomy fall weather persuades cooks and chefs to think about comfort foods. I want to advise you that during the cooler months you’ll witness a few special dishes, dishes both wholesome and satisfying. To get your appetite going, here’s a few dishes you’ll see this fall season at Colleton; Lamb Neck, the Osso Bucco, and the Short Rib! Any option is sure to cover your comfort food needs!
 
We’ll have the red wine ready!
 
Happy Fall & Happy Braising!
 
—Chef Robert

Bridge Bowl 2019

Colleton River Club was pleased to welcome back the Bridge Bowl Championship.  The Bridge Bowl Tennis Event was started in 2015 as a way for our tennis community to use our love for the game to give back to local charities.  There has always been an underlying “off island” versus “island” rivalry and this rivalry became the format for the Bridge Bowl. Made up of an Island Team and a Mainland Team, the competition consists of a series of doubles round robins between each of the teams culminating in a deciding doubles final between the various levels for the Island and the Mainland. 

Bridge Bowl 2019 championship results-CONGRATS TO THE MAINLAND

M=Mainland I=Island

Men 3.0 

court 1: Hahn/Marcotte (M)

court 2: McShane/Withrow (M)

court 3: Flickinger/Durrin (M)

Women 3.0

court 1: Clark/Katoh (M)

court 2: Couchillon/Faciszewski (M)

court 3: Hahn/Curcio (M)

Men 3.5

court 1: Tolley/Elgass (I)

court 2: Hawk/Lezcano (I)

court 3: Blackwell/Thomas (M)

Women 3.5

court 1: Polites/Todd (M)

court 2: Kelly/Marler (M)

court 3: Li/Crutchley (I)

Men 4.0

court 1: Bensch/Cannarozzi (M)

court 2: Meeder/Nitz (M)

court 3: De la Cruz/Villalon (I)

Women 4.0

court 1: Bradsaw/Childers (M)

court 2: Castricone/Bautista (I)

court 3: Barlett/Picano (I)

Men 4.5

court 1: Keller/Robertson (M)

court 2: Child/Frangos (I)

court 3: Stone/Torres (M)

Women 4.5

court 1: Cambron/Meeder (M)

court 2: Gillis/Pollizer (I)

court 3: Archibald/Fisher (I)

Open Men (4.5 plus players.  Basically the pros)

Wuller/Leal (I)

Open Women

Webb/Wiren (M)

Open Mixed

O’Regan/Webb (M)

Kent’s Korner – Water Wisely for Dew Removal

Oftentimes, I get asked, what time is the best time to irrigate a lawn. Normally, it is best to begin irrigation cycles in the early morning hours and target the water to be completed before 8 am, when the natural drying process is underway. Watering your lawn in this manner helps decrease the wet period of the turf and is a good first step in suppressing disease. Dew begins setting after sunset and dissipates in the morning as the sun rises. Dew is a combination of condensation and guttation (excretions of sap) water from the turf’s respiration. This plant exudate is full of natural juices that combine with normal condensation to create an ideal environment for disease. Planning your irrigation to help wash guttation water off the turf and interrupt the dew period is a good way to improve your lawn.
 
We follow these same watering principles on both courses to help reduce disease. In addition to good watering practices, you may notice our teams periodically dragging a hose down the course fairways with maintenance carts in the mornings. This process is done on days we are not mowing the fairways to remove the dew from the grass blades and promote quicker drying. Knocking the dew down not only helps keep our member’s feet dry, it also improves ball roll and aids in disease prevention. Reducing the wet period and promoting drying is an important part of interrupting the pathogen’s life cycles, minimizing disease, and promoting healthy turf. Hope to see you on the courses.

Dragging fairways to promote drying

Colleton Cares – Pass It Along

The annual Pass It Along event, hosted by our gracious members and organized by Mrs. Gelinas, will be held on Thursday, November 14th from 11am-3pm at the Dye Maintenance Facility.

For those that are not familiar with this event, this is basically a free yard sale for our employees. Each employee will be assigned a designated time to “shop” at the yard sale and all of the items are donated by the members. Please note the following:

  1. This event is for hourly Colleton River employees only
  2. All managers will be expected to help with this event at some point throughout the day- assignments coming soon…
  3. Salaried employees will have an opportunity to shop after all hourly employees have shopped
  4. Regular temp workers who work at Colleton River on a regular basis will be invited to shop at the end of the event
    1. Managers- please provide me with a list of these names no later than Friday, October 18th
  5. Names will be drawn and designated shopping times will be announced prior to the date of the event
  6. No family members allowed
  7. Bags will not be provided by Colleton River

More information to come as we get closer to the date!