Kent’s Korner – December 6, 2019

Top of the Food Chain

Among the myriad of benefits of living adjacent to the river and amongst the Lowcountry marshes is the abundance of wildlife. Near the top of the food chain are a group of majestic birds classified as raptors. These birds use their keen eyesight to scour the marshes and the pineland forests hunting for vertebrates including; rodents, small mammals, lizards, fish, and snakes. The American Bald Eagles have returned and are active along the marsh on hole nine of the Nicklaus Course and along the fifteenth and sixteenth holes of the Dye Course. Red-tailed hawks strike fear in the hearts of squirrels on the Borland and have been active along Magnolia Blossom Drive. For early risers, keep an eye out for the Great Horned Owl, who has recently been spotted between Inverness Drive and Merion Way, and a local Barred Owl, who roosts near the duck pond on Foot Point Drive. If you are interested in observing some of these fascinating species, an active group of birders lead by Mark Hyner, Karen Anderson, and Stephen Dickson routinely meet with the Colleton River Birding Club and catalogue bird species in the neighborhood. Both novice and experienced birders are welcomed to join the Birding Club. Expect another great month of golf at Colleton River Club and take time to enjoy the natural beauty that surrounds us.

Red-tailed Hawk overseeing the bush hogging process.

Barred Owl roosting on Foot Point Road.

Bald Eagle perched on Turnberry Way.

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