Group Charter Trip – July 5th

Members and their guests enjoyed a Group Fishing Charter on Friday, July 5th with Captain Jason!  Check out some of their catches…

Howard York’s son with shark

Howard York’s grandson

Richard Collela fishing

Dennis Zvosec with shark

 

 

Kent’s Korner – Speed Management

As part of our normal maintenance at Colleton River Club, we measure green speeds daily with a Stimpmeter and post them in the golf shop. Used on a level portion of the green, this tool is designed to release a golf ball from an inclined plane at a consistent height. Taking the average distance in feet of three balls rolled in opposing directions determines the Stimpmeter reading, or green speed. At higher green speeds, more caution is required when putting. In 1978 the USGA adopted the use of the Stimpmeter to provide consistency throughout their championships.
  
Along with knowing how fast the greens are putting, Stimpmeter readings and surface firmness measurements are tools we use in the agronomy department to help direct maintenance activities. Everything that occurs on a golf course happens in a cyclical pattern. Along with weather, normal sound maintenance practices such as topdressing, grooming, venting, fertilizing, and irrigating all affect green speed and play an important role in producing healthy turf. This week we vented and topdressed the Nicklaus Course greens to address the surface firmness. Immediately following these procedures, the green speeds temporarily take a back seat to the agronomy practices that are required to sustain the playing conditions we all desire. Knowing the speed limit, by prioritizing and managing these steps in a thoughtful, calculated approach is the key to sustaining good conditions. Next time you are in the golf shop and notice the green speed in the tens, consider what the agronomy team is doing to improve the turf health and achieve the consistently smooth and fast greens we have become accustomed to.   
 

Venting to incorporate sand

Kent’s Korner – Course Stewardship

Summer rains create soft conditions that promote ball marks when shots hit the greens. Please be stewards of the course by practicing good golf etiquette and repairing ball marks. A wise old pro once said, “A good player understands that it is their responsibility to return the course better than when they approached it.” After hitting a good shot into the green, please diligently inspect the green and repair ball marks or indentations in the surface. Freshly made ball marks are easier to repair than pitch marks that remain unattended overnight. When repairing a ball mark, it is best to avoid lifting or prying up on the indention. Insert a ball mark repair tool or tee at the edge of the indention and heal the mark by lightly pressing down and toward the center of the damaged area. Make several successive nudges toward the direction of the incoming shot, and then tap the area down with the heel of your putter. Next time you enjoy the course, encourage your foursome of friends to assist you with tending to ball marks on the greens. Click here for the video on how to properly repair a ball mark.

A ball mark creates a road block for the golf ball

 

TRX at the Fitness Center

TRX is a full body workout that uses the person’s own body weight as the resistance instead of machines or dumbbells. TRX Suspension Training develops strength, balance, cardiovascular endurance, flexibility and core stability simultaneously. We have eight TRX Suspension Trainer “straps” mounted from the ceiling in our fitness studio. Each student has their own TRX Suspension Trainer to use during the class. There is another mounted at the front of the class for me, your instructor to demonstrate the exercises for you. 

If I had to choose only one training tool to use, I would easily pick the TRX Suspension Trainer because it is a highly portable performance training tool that leverages gravity and the user’s body weight to complete 100s of exercises. You’re in control of how much you want to challenge yourself during each exercise – because you can simply adjust your body position to add or decrease resistance. I really love how the TRX uses so many muscle groups at one time. The beauty of the TRX is that even when an exercise focuses on your upper body, it still recruits your core, glutes and legs to keep your body stable. Plus, the instability of the straps and handles increases the benefits to the muscles you’re targeting.

Advantages of our TRX Suspension Trainer Class:

  • Delivers a fast, effective total-body workout. We hit ALL the muscle groups 
  • Helps build a rock-solid core. You are using your CORE the entire class
  • Increases muscular strength, endurance and flexibility. Good for golf, tennis, good for LIFE!
  • Benefits people of all fitness levels (pro athletes to seniors, class regulars to beginners)
  • By utilizing your own body weight, the TRX Suspension Trainer provides greater performance and functionality than large exercise machines.

We have two TRX classes at the Club. Tuesday mornings at 8:00 and 9:00. The class is easily modified so it’s great for beginners. It may look intimidating to walk into a TRX class for the first time and see the yellow and black straps hanging from the ceiling, but it’s not at all scary! TRX is a lot of fun and I will be there to guide you every step of the way. We start each class with a simple warmup that helps you get the feel for the TRX Suspension Trainer (the straps). The first half hour we do standing exercises that work the entire body, then we get down on the floor for planks and bridges using the TRX. We spend the last 10 minutes stretching. TRX is a great class and we hope you will join us!

Jessica Haynes

Personal Trainer

Kent’s Korner – July 5, 2019

When Johnny Miller retired from the NBC telecast in February, greenskeepers around the globe had hoped the term “grain” would fade into obscurity. While the term is generally overused to describe missed putts, it can be an accurate way to describe the lateral growth habit produced by ultra-dwarf bermudagrasses. If left unattended, these stems grow in abundance down slopes creating an obvious surface pattern. While playing either of the courses at Colleton River, from time to time, you may notice small parallel lines running across the green’s surfaces. The fine lines evident on the putting surfaces are a result of recent verticutting/grooming procedures. Rather than cutting on a horizontal plane like a normal mower, these cutting units rotate vertically into the turf surface. Set slightly below the height of cut, these blades penetrate the turf, severing stolons (plant shoots along the surface) and thinning the leaf canopy. Following the grooming, we topdress the greens to fill any voids and further smooth the playing surface. These cultivation techniques optimize putting quality, reduce grain, promote an upright growth habit, alleviate spongy surface conditions, and enhance surface smoothness. Immediately following this process, the greens may slow down slightly and appear scarred from the disruption. These procedures are normally completed during course closures, and in approximately seven to ten days following the process the greens will be smoother, faster, and firmer. We hope everyone enjoys Colleton River Club over the holiday weekend, and I hope to see you on the course.

Grooming short term disruption for long term gains

Around the Table – Trading Places, New Faces – In the Kitchens

Pictured above left to right: Executive Chef Chef Robert Wysong, Brian Freeman, Garde Manager Chef, and Chris Weil, Sauté Chef.

If you noticed the new staff announcements last week, I’m happy to report that “Trading Places and New Faces” also applies to our culinary team, and the timing could not be better. The softer summer season allows us time to dream up new ideas, hone our training and bring a renewed focus to our programs. Here’s what you can expect from the culinary staff as we transition through the summer:  

WHAT IS DIFFERENT

Several new members have joined the team, and that’s very exciting! We look forward to you meeting our new crew members and enjoying what they bring “to the table,” so to speak!

Veronica Dempsey
Veronica leads the preparation of employee dining as the Team Meal Chef, feeding 120 staffers daily throughout the week.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Jill Hurley
Jill has joined us from the Ford Plantation, and will devote her efforts as Line Chef to Sunday Brunch, baking and banquet, and event preparations.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Anthony Guiliano
Anthony will assist in management and oversee the Club’s a la carte dining services as Chef de Cuisine.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WHAT WILL CHANGE
Enhanced Creativity
With more team interaction comes better collaboration on all levels.
Refreshed Perspective
Our experiences dictate what we bring to the table and “new blood” pushes us forward.
New Ideas
Exciting viewpoints and the exchange of information is the key to our growth.

WHAT REMAINS THE SAME

Commitment to Quality
The only choice for Colleton: Hand-selected Nebraska Beef, local seafood delivered daily, and specific local, seasonal produce.
Commitment to Service
While transitioning, our commitment to your dining experience is our priority.
Commitment to Consistency
At all levels, all the time.

David Hills, Chef – Rotisseur

In short, there is much work to do. But as a team we are reinvigorated and truly excited to provide the very best service to theColleton River Club membership.
We will continue to bring you the outstanding culinary experiences that you’ve come to expect from the kitchen—and we hope to keep surprising you along the way. Have a wonderful week!
—Chef Robert

 

Kent’s Korner – Protect the Rim

Golf can be one of the most frustrating but satisfying games you can imagine. Billions of dollars are spent annually attempting to put a small white ball in a round hole. At Colleton River Club, the Agronomy team changes the hole locations daily on both courses to provide variety, enhance the golf experience, and to help ensure that well struck putts reach their intended destination. The elusive finishing point on each green is a cup that measures a mere 4.25″ in diameter. During hole changing procedures, an Agronomy team member paces off the green to identify the new pin location, cuts the hole, and recesses the cup 1″ below the green’s surface. Once the cup is set, the final step includes an application of paint around the inner rim of the hole. This paint, or “hole-in-white” application, helps clearly identify the target for the player and protects the integrity of the cup.
 
The USGA and the R&A (The Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews) have recently adopted a new rule 13.2 a-1, Leaving Flagstick in Hole. This allows a player the option to make a stroke with the flagstick left in the hole so that it is possible for the ball in motion to hit the flagstick without penalty. If you opt to take this approach, after finishing each hole, please take care not to disrupt the hole when retrieving your ball. Contact with the painted inner lip or damage to the edge of the hole breaks down the integrity of the hole and can impact your fellow competitors. Thank you for taking care so that everyone can enjoy the golf experience.

Around the Table – June 19, 2019

Summertime Revisited

When I think about summer, I’m reminded of classic summer picnic foods. Growing up in the 1970s in the suburbs of DC, summer meals were just basic. Occasionally we would go out, but mostly we stayed at home for dinner. (Six o’clock sharp!) Daylight lasted far longer after dinner, which meant more time to play, and more time for the folks on the back porch to talk late into the night. I’m sure it really isn’t that much different now but thinking about summertime dinners always brings back memories of simpler times, the sound of crickets as a backdrop to the evening and the vague smell of summer just hanging in the air somehow.
 
My favorite summer foods now are the same ones that I loved then—corn on the cob, chilled watermelon, fried chicken and, if we were lucky, steamed blue crabs covered in Old Bay seasoning. There was no butter, no cocktail or lemon—but maybe the opportunity for a swig from an unattended National Bohemian or Pabst Blue Ribbon if nobody was looking!
 
These days I’m thinking about how to infuse those summertime favorites with new life, creating lighter profiles and layering unexpected flavors, but still in keeping with all the best of childhood recollections. While you savor summer, I hope you’ll try and love these updated classics just as much as I do!
 
Watermelon and Feta Salad
Cube a very ripe watermelon (about 4 C.) and 1/2 C. feta cheese. Add 1 T. packed fresh mint leaves, sliced, a bit of thinly sliced jalapeño(about half of a small one), a squeeze of fresh lime, a drizzle of high-quality olive oil and a pinch of coarse kosher salt. Toss together lightly to combine.
 
 
Summer Grilled Corn
Grill corn in the husk until charred. Peel and cut the kernels from the cob with a sharp knife. Meanwhile, grill a red bell pepper until charred. Dice and combine with the corn kernels. Season with coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper. Add a drizzle of high-quality olive oil, a squeeze of fresh lemon and finish with a sprinkle of a little chopped cilantro or basil.
 
Crispy Szechuan “Hot” Chicken
Marinate four boneless, skinless chicken breasts for several hours in a mixture of 4 oz. honey, 12 oz. buttermilk, 1 oz. salt and 1 oz. crushed Szechuan peppercorn.
 
Remove chicken from marinade. Set chicken aside and add the marinade to a medium saucepan. Simmer mixture over low heat until just combined, about 10 minutes.
 
Meanwhile, dust chicken in 6 T. flour seasoned with 1 T. salt and 1/2 T. pepper. Shallow fry in 6 T. of canola or corn oil until done & crispy (about 5-6 minutes per side); drain on paper towels.
 
Brush the crispy chicken with the sauce or toss together for a deeper, more robust coating.
                                           
 
Last, but certainly not least, be sure to keep an ice-cold beer nearby (don’t take your eye off it, now!) and enjoy the best of summer. Cheers!
 
-Chef Robert
 
 
 
 
 
NAME THAT COCKTAIL CONTEST RESULTS
After tabulating votes for our 16 entries, the winning name
for the Fourth of July specialty cocktail is…
 
Yankee Doodle Dickel Dandy
 
The winning entry was submited by Sandy Wooster, who will receive
two free drink coupons to enjoy this delicious summer concoction.
Congratulations, Mrs. Wooster!

Ladies Love Libations – Motown Night

‘Get Ready’  (The Temptations,1966)….I ‘Heard It Through The Grapevine’ (Marvin Gaye, 1968)there’d be some  ‘Dancing In The Street’ (Martha and the Vandellas, 1964)!!!  When you start the evening with a Sloe Gin Fizz, you know you are back in the 60’s!  Add a great disc jockey and disco ball, and you’ve got ladies dancing even before dinner is served. This was one fun night with everyone getting into the retro spirit!

 The L3 Ladies celebrated the 60th Anniversary of Motown in style!  The outfits ranged from cool hippie style to The Supremes Chic.  This elegant, sophisticated night club environment sported a rocking vibe for sure!  A disco ball, suspended from the ceiling front and center, threw myriad spots of light spinning around the walls of the room.  The decorated tables were as beautiful and clever as could be….“vinyl record” placemats encircled gorgeous floral arrangements of oranges, yellows & purples … floating candles adorned with musical notes and more vinyl records added the perfect touch!   Posters of our favorites lined the walls, including The Supremes, Smokey Robinson & more…. . 

 Dashing bartenders, Tony Ying, Richard Warner, and Jack Lambe, concocted Manhattans and Sloe Gin Fizzes.  Now those were some specialty cocktails!   This party’s definitely getting started!  Daryl, the DJ, played famous songs from the era, as well as contemporary hits and from then on, everyone danced the night away!   Countless people described the night as “a real blast from the past” – check it out below!

 A magnanimous thank you to our superbly talented hostesses; Michelle Warner, Jackie Perrotti and Sue Ying.  These rockin’ “Supremes” worked tirelessly to put on this fantastic Motown event! 

Save the date for our next event, Fall into Fashion, Thursday, September 19th !

Lifelong Learning Group Presents ‘Blues to Jazz’ at Colleton’s Nicklaus Club

Debi Incandela, Lifelong Learning Committee Group member envisioned a musical dinner experience featuring blues and jazz for her fellow Colleton members. Debi reached out to the multi-talented musician, Lavon Stevens to conduct an evening of music and its history and they soon learned they both speak the language of music.

Mr. Lavon’s extensive repertoire encompasses soulful jazz, blues, contemporary, and gospel.  A native of Savannah, Lavon began his musical studies at the age of seven with the violin. By 13, he was listening to his classically trained brother and then playing piano by ear. He studied piano and voice at Dekalb College in Atlanta from 1979 to 1983. Lavon performed nationally for years before returning to the Lowcountry.

LLG Committee members, Debi Incandela and Mr. Stevens welcome Lavon Stevens who was accompanied by three talented jazz students.

Mr. Stevens offered a delightful blend of entertainment and education as he discussed the roots of jazz and then illustrated his points with music and song.  Explaining that jazz is the only truly original American art form, he pointed to the influence of African music (string plucking), drum lines, horns used in funeral processions and ring shouts.  The origin of the word, ‘jazz’ is still an historical contention but the best contender is the similarity of “jazz” to “jasm”, an obsolete slang term meaning spirit, energy, and vigor.

Kelda Maynard partnered with Debi Incandela to transform the Nicklaus Clubhouse into the ‘Nicklaus Jazz Club’ for the evening.

Lavon characterized gospel as the sound of hope.  Gospel music is a form of euphoric, rhythmic, spiritual music rooted in the solo and responsive church singing of the African American South. Its development coincided with – and is germane to – the development of rhythm and blues.

Lavon works from this philosophy: “The greatest power in the world is love, the second greatest power in the world is music. I use the power of the music to translate love all over the world.”

The ‘Nicklaus Jazz Club’ evening was a resounding success.

Debi Incandela capped the evening by singing, The Birth of the Blues’ with Lavon on piano and accompaniment by the jazz musicians of the future.