Kent’s Korner – Plugs of Progress

Aeration is arguably the dirtiest word in golf. The mere sound of the term makes both members and superintendents cringe. Just when the greens, tees, and fairways seem like they are at their best, the golf course maintenance team pulls plugs and jeopardizes the prized conditions everyone desires. This temporary inconvenience is created not to aggravate golfers or disrupt playability, but to improve and sustain good playing conditions. Among the many benefits of aeration are improved water infiltration, dilution of thatch, enhanced soil gas exchange, and deeper rooting. Good aeration practices are the cornerstone of championship conditions and are essential to the long-term vitality of great greens. Unlike courses in the Northeast and Midwest, the warm season turf varieties found throughout the Lowcountry benefit from summer aeration.

Both of the courses at Colleton River Club will be aerated twice this summer. The first of these planned cultural practices will begin on the Dye Course on Wednesday, May 29. The Nicklaus Course will follow three weeks later, on Tuesday, June 18. Please see the aeration schedule below that outlines our summer cultivations and plan accordingly. We apologize for this temporary inconvenience, but please understand sound cultural practices are paramount to the goal of sustaining good playing conditions.

Colleton River Club Aeration Schedule
Dye Course Aeration
May 29 – June 7
Nicklaus Course Aeration
June 18 – June 30
Dye Course Aeration
July 23 – Aug 4
Nicklaus Course Aeration
Aug 13 – Aug 26

The Perfectly Grilled Steak – Step by Step – May 15, 2019


Greetings from the Clubhouse!

Summer is here, and there’s almost nothing better than a sizzling summer grill, so after the prime beef soapbox of last week, I thought it important to offer some insight on producing a perfectly grilled steak. There is some great beef out there, and there is also a lot that is mediocre. The key to great steak success is buying a good quality cut of your liking, practicing at the grill, and treating your steaks well by following a few simple steps.

I crave a great steak now and then, and when that craving hits, only a thick ribeye from the outdoor grill will do. The ribeye contains several muscles, which provide different textures and flavors, and it’s a is a bit fattier than some cuts, which imparts both flavor and moisture to the finished product. (And yes, you can trim away the fat after cooking.)

Remember, every steak, every grill, every cook, and every outcome will be unique. The purpose of this advice is to even the odds as much as possible, so please use the steps below as a guideline to grilling your steak the way you want it—and not just by luck:

Step 1 – Important – Source a beautiful, well-marbled steak, the cut of your choice.
Step 2 – Very Important – Allow steak to come to room temperature, at least thirty minutes.
Step 3 – More Important – Season liberally and thoughtfully – you have choices here:
-Standard approach: Kosher salt & freshly ground black pepper
-Natural enhancement: fine sea salt and a drizzle of olive oil
-Robust flavor: brushing of olive oil, freshly minced garlic and parsley, salt and pepper
Step 4 – Prepare the grill and get it hot! Use a natural, non-aerosol pan spray to coat the grates.
Step 5 – Sear the steak over high heat, then transfer to an indirect position and lower the temperature. Trust your senses, and refer to my handy Steak Grilling Guidelines below, as needed.
Step 6- Most Important! Let the steak rest at least five minutes before slicing or cutting.
-The internal temperature will rise 5˚ or more while at rest.
-Trust your senses!


Like anything you want to master, grilling takes practice. At least with steak, you get to enjoy the results of each test run! Until next time, fire up the grill and show that New York Strip who’s boss!
-Chef Robert Wysong

Around the Table-May 8, 2019

Colleton River Beef
The finest beef available. Period.

Many of you are great fans of our beef program here at Colleton River, though I’m sure there are some who haven’t learned much about it yet. Today I’m taking a moment to describe our program in detail.

First and foremost, it’s a premium program that is set up specifically for our Club. With a craving for high quality beef and an eye toward healthier dining, we’ve sought out the very best produced and best handled beef available, yielding some of the leanest “center-of-the-plate” options we enjoy here at Colleton River.

Facts on the cattle itself and how it’s raised:

-The cattle are Aberdeen Angus stock with no outside influences
-It’s mostly raised in Nebraska and Georgia by cattlemen we know
-The genetics of the bulls are specifically developed for flavor and taste
-Herds are carefully fed in Nebraska and Iowa by ranchers we know
-The cattle are never treated with growth hormones
-They enjoy an organic corn diet and pure water from the Nebraska aquifer

That’s a great beginning, but how is it handled?

-The cattle are carefully selected for very specific characteristics
-Production is by an independent packing house located in Omaha
-Our cattle are humanely treated at the time of production
-Finished-cut items are produced to our specification
-Careful USDA grading and selection processes yielding the prime designation
-We enjoy a direct shipment from processing plant to Colleton River

With that said, you know the taste quality because:

-The reputation of Aberdeen Angus breeding stock
-The quality care and feeding programs by our friends in Nebraska and Iowa
-Rich marbling from the all-corn diet
-Our in-house aging processes to enhance the taste quality
-Our simple, product-first cooking approach

In summer…

or winter…

count on the very best in Colleton Beef!

I hope this helps you appreciate the uniqueness of our program. I also hope that you will try a New York strip or a filet mignon with us very soon! Also remember, you can pre-order and pick up these steaks for your grill by contacting the Nicklaus front desk at 843.836.4400. Until next time, have a “beefy week”!
-Chef Robert Wysong

Kent’s Korner-Birdies and Eagles

May is one of the driest months of the year in the Lowcountry and offers plenty of opportunity to enjoy the course before the summer heat and rains return. If you find yourself short of birdies and eagles on the course, you may consider joining the growing list of bird enthusiasts in the community, including the Colleton River Birding Club. (Contact Karen Anderson: 203.451.5882 or Stephen Dickson: 414.243.1880.)
Birding provides many rewards and offers an opportunity to enjoy nature and heighten your sense of awareness. Birding engages your power of observation, expands your mind, and deepens your listening skills. Consider spending an afternoon locating and documenting some of our resident birds. See how many different birds you can identify using this helpful link https://www.allaboutbirds.org/. While out and about in the community, be sure to enjoy any number of Bluebirds dashing about gathering insects for their newly hatched chicks. Keep an eye out for the red flash of a Cardinal or a Scarlet Tanager. Consider spending a morning trying to get a glimpse of a Turkey meandering through the understory on Whitehall Drive looking for seeds or the Barred Owl returning to roost after a successful hunt. Recently, Red-tailed Hawks have been active on the Borland in the afternoons, while Ospreys can be seen working the marshes looking for fish. The newest member of our Bald Eagle family is creating quite a stir on Inverness Drive as he stretches his new wings despite the objections of numerous black birds and neighboring Crows. Expect another great month of golf at Colleton River Club, and take time to enjoy the natural beauty your wonderful Club has to offer.

The young Bald Eagle has recently fledged and is out of the nest.

Around the Table-May 2, 2019

Cooking with Herbs
Welcome to my table! This is the very first edition of my blog, and I’m really looking forward to sharing tips, tricks and my own culinary point of view with you. “Around the Table” will publish regularly each week and, if you enjoy exploring food a much as I do, I think we’re going to have a lot of fun. For now, let’s dive right into today’s topic—herbs.

Spring has sprung and so have the herbs! The garden store shelves are full of healthy-looking plants in need of good homes. Herbs are sturdy, forgiving to grow, and can add so much flavor to your spring and summer cooking.

Some of the garden’s returning guests are already making a strong comeback, which is nice to see. Below are few of my absolute favorites with some notes on their uses and unique qualities. These herbs are already growing like crazy and bursting with flavor!

Chocolate Mint
Rich, unique, rounded and mild for a member of the mint family.

Lavender & Rosemary
Considered to be very strong and specialized, but nothing more wonderful with a grilled lamb T-bone.


Oregano
Along with my good friend parsley, can wonderful in pasta dishes, pasta salads, on your grilled vegetables or meats.

Thai Basil
Another obscure favorite, known to be pungent, spicy, exotic and a bit mysterious. This unique variety is easy to grow, interesting, and can bring out the best flavors in your cooking. (Try some freshly torn leaves in your quick stir-fried vegetables to see what I mean.)

I look forward to spring each year because it’s the absolute best time for planting, growing, and cooking with herbs—period. Summer is nice but give me the spring. Here are a few more herb–to-main-item accompaniment suggestions you’ll want to try out in your own kitchen:

With Chicken, Fish or Shrimp
Chopped Tarragon and a Squeeze of Lemon
Thyme or Lemon Thyme
Chopped Cilantro, Fresh Squeezed Lime & Minced Jalepeno

With Sautéed Squash & Zucchini
or Fresh Tomatoes
Opal Basil
Genovese Basil
Snipped Chives

With Roasted Potatoes
Minced Rosemary & Olive Oil
Minced Chives, Black Pepper, Fine Sea Salt

I hope you’ve enjoyed our visit and will join me again next week to see what I’m cooking up for the next installment of “Around the Table.” See you then!
-Chef Robert Wysong

Kent’s Korner-Going Vertical

The onset of warmer weather conditions allows us the opportunity to condition the greens more aggressively for upcoming events. If you’ve played in the past few days, you may notice remnants from recent surface-maintenance treatments on the greens. The fine lines evident on the putting surfaces are a result of recent verticutting/grooming procedures. Rather than cutting on a horizontal plane like a normal mower, these cutting units rotate vertically into the turf surface. Set slightly below the height of cut, these blades penetrate the turf severing stolons (plant shoots along the surface) and thinning the leaf canopy. Following the grooming, we topdress the greens to fill any voids and further smooth the surface. These cultivation techniques optimize putting quality, reduce grain, promote an upright growth habit, alleviate spongy surface conditions, and enhance surface smoothness. Immediately following this process, the greens may slow down slightly and appear scarred from the disruption to the surface. Approximately seven to ten days following the process, the greens will be smoother, faster, and firmer.

Ultra-dwarf bermudagrasses make excellent putting greens because they have been bred for their dense, fine leaf texture, and their ability to tolerate low mowing heights. Although we continue to stretch the limits of the grass, it is important to recognize that the natural growth pattern of bermudagrass is to spread and grow laterally. Periodic vertical mowing to further promote dense upright turf is an important part of getting the most out of our grass.

Neighbors Meeting Neighbors

Colleton River Club Members recently enjoyed a March Madness themed Neighbors Meeting Neighbors event! Guests met Tuesday, March 26th at the Nick Clubhouse for cocktails and dinner! These events are a great way for us to welcome newer Members to the committee and are always an exclusive and fun time!

Play for P.I.N.K 2019

Colleton River Club is pleased to announce that we raised over $34,000 in our annual March Play for P.I.N.K. week. Bridge, Canasta, tennis, and golf events were held throughout the community as well as a silent auction and dinner to help raise funds for the worthy cause.

To speed advances in breast cancer detection, treatment and survivorship, Play for P.I.N.K. (Prevention, Immediate Diagnosis, New Technology, Knowledge) supports thousands of volunteers nationwide as they raise funds for research through sporting and lifestyle events. Their collective efforts raise $4.75 million annually — and 100% of that goes to the Breast Cancer Research Foundation.

Colleton River Club looks forward to hosting this annual event that aids improving outcomes and uncovering new approaches to this complex, challenging disease. President, Myra J. Biblowit states “Play for P.I.N.K.’s continued support is critical to the grant-making capability of the Breast Cancer Research Foundation. We are extremely proud of our partnership and indebted to all that support us and believe in the cause.”

“We appreciate those who donated, worked and played, making Play for P.I.N.K. an incredible success,” said Tim Bakels, General Manager of Colleton River Club. “Many months of planning by CRC committee members and staff went into ensuring a smooth operation, and as usual the Members participation was excellent.”

Colleton’s Lifelong Learning Group Hosts ‘Rocket Scientists’

LLG Committee member, Peg Roedel has had a great track record mining the talents of Colleton’s own members as LLG speakers. Learning that ‘Mac’ MacIlroy had written a book that Pat Conroy lauded as “A great book about friendship, growing up in the fifties, and a lost America that will never come again”, Peg and her fellow LLG committee member Gale Stafford worked together to arrange for Mac to share his book and experiences on November 8, 2018 in Colleton’s Nicklaus Ballroom.

LLG Committee members ,Gale Stafford and Peg Roedel, host author, ‘Mac’ MacIlroy.

Not Exactly Rocket Scientists is a collection of stories written by three boyhood friends about their lives in small-town America in the 1950’s; a time when many kids played unsupervised all day and parents didn’t worry because everyone in town was looking out for them. Mac’s childhood was the era between the end of WWII and the evolution of the Vietnam War and the social unrest that marked the decades of the 60’s and 70’s. He read selections from the chapters he wrote and regaled the audience with his experiences during that time.


MacIlroy is retired from his career as an attorney, CEO and adjunct professor.

Members enjoyed a buffet of 1950 food (looking at you deviled eggs!) capped off with angel food cake with strawberries and whipped cream and Coke and Root Beer floats.